We are Susan G. Komen - a force united by a promise to end breast cancer.

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Alantheia was diagnosed with breast cancer just after learning that both of her daughters were pregnant. She wasn't sure where to turn, and feared that she would not have the chance to know her grandchildren.

Thanks in part to a grant from Susan G. Komen, Alantheia's mammograms, surgeries and follow-up support were covered. Today, Alantheia stays busy with the little ones and is grateful for Komen's support throughout her journey.

You can help support breast cancer survivors like Alantheia in receiving the treatment they deserve.

Learn more about how Susan G. Komen® is helping to save lives and end breast cancer.

With survivors and activists in more than 120 cities and communities across the globe, the Susan G. Komen Affiliate Network is the nation's largest private funder of community-based breast health education and breast cancer screening and treatment programs. Find your local Susan G.Komen Affiliate.

 

In the past year, Susan G. Komen's community grants provided financial and social support for more than 100,000 families impacted by breast cancer, like Alantheia. Additionally, Komen Affiliates—working in concert with local organizations—awarded more than $93 million in needs-based community grants last year. More information on Komen community grants.

 

If you or someone you know is facing breast cancer, the Susan G. Komen Breast Care Helpline serves women, men and families in need, providing breast cancer education, psychosocial support and resources for financial assistance. The main role of the Helpline is to provide support and help clients advocate for themselves and problem-solve by providing compassion and access to Komen information and resources. For more information, please call 1-877 GO KOMEN (1-877-465-6636)

 

Through community outreach and education, Komen provides communities with breast cancer information, tools and resources to empower them to take action. Learn more about Komen resources.

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Kristi thought she knew breast cancer. She'd been a researcher for years, but, at 37, she got a shock. She went from researcher to patient when she was diagnosed with triple negative breast cancer, and now she sees breast cancer through a new lens.

Her experience inspired her to focus on new targets for therapy, as well as a diagnostic blood test. She's so grateful to Susan G. Komen for the grant that allows her to apply what she learned as a breast cancer patient back to her own research.

She is very fortunate to have been able to overcome her battle with breast cancer, and each and every day she is thankful to be here. The journey has empowered her to be as aggressive in her breast cancer research as her breast cancer was with her.

You can help support researchers like Kristi in their mission to end breast cancer.

Learn more about how Susan G. Komen® is helping to save lives and end breast cancer.

Finding breast cancer early, when it's easiest to treat, can save lives. Research estimates that regular screenings with mammography have resulted in 30 percent fewer deaths from breast cancer. However, mammography is not perfect. It can sometimes miss tumors or identify tumors that are not cancerous, particularly in women with dense breasts or who are at high risk for developing breast cancer.  Therefore, Susan G. Komen is committed to finding better, more sensitive methods identifying breast cancer earlier.

 

Susan G. Komen has invested more than $30 million in over 100 grants to find better technologies and tests for breast cancer screening and diagnosis, as well as educational strategies to increase the number of women who participate in breast cancer screenings. One such grant went to Dr. Kristi Egland to develop a blood test that will detect breast cancer.

 

Through a Komen research grant, Dr. Egland and her research team have completed the first steps toward the development of a blood test that will detect breast cancer based on proteins expressed by the patient's immune system. While more work is needed, such a blood test could simplify breast cancer detection and diagnosis around the world.

 

More information on Dr. Egland's research.

 

As a result of Dr. Egland's experience as a patient, and her knowledge of breast cancer research, Kristi donated her own breast tissue and encourages women to donate both their cancerous and healthy breast tissue to research because these tissues can help us find the next breakthrough. Learn more about donating breast tissue.

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Marisol was only 24 years old when she was diagnosed with breast cancer. With no health insurance and a single mom, she had no idea how she would pay for treatment. Thanks to a local Susan G. Komen grant, Marisol received financial assistance for her treatment and has no evidence of cancer.

Overcoming this deadly disease motivates Marisol every day to educate others about the disease. Today, she keeps her friends and family informed about breast cancer and leads a Komen Race for the Cure team, hoping to give others the courage to take charge of their health.

You can help support breast cancer survivors like Marisol in receiving the treatment they deserve.

Learn more about how Susan G. Komen® is helping to save lives and end breast cancer.

Breast cancer is rare in young women. Only 5 percent of all breast cancers diagnosed in the United States each year occur in women under 40. This can make a diagnosis especially shocking and challenging for young women. At a time in life most often reserved for family and career, issues of treatment, recovery and survivorship suddenly take top priority. Learn More About Breast Cancer in Young Women

 

After the emotional and physical impact of a breast cancer diagnosis, financial decisions can seem overwhelming. Major issues such as insurance coverage, paying for medication and getting transportation to and from treatment can be challenging. More information about insurance and other financial issues

 

Chat with other women and men affected by breast cancer.

 

Susan G. Komen funds various programs that in turn help those facing financial challenges such as paying for medication and getting transportation to and from treatment. The funding that Komen provides to these organizations bridges the gap for medically underserved (or uninsured) individuals who are actively undergoing breast cancer treatment. More information on Komen's national treatment assistance grants.

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When Trey began studying the genetics of breast cancer, he had no idea his family would be touched by the disease. To Trey, cancer research is very personal, and he's reminded daily of the urgency to find a cure.

With Komen-funded support, Trey's team focuses on finding new targeted therapeutic strategies for triple negative breast cancer and HER2-positive cancer. There's a lot more research to be done, and as someone with loved ones fighting cancer, his mission is to continue to work passionately towards finding a cure.

You can help support researchers like Trey in their mission to end breast cancer.

Learn more about how Susan G. Komen® is helping to save lives and end breast cancer.

Approximately 15 percent of all breast cancers are diagnosed as triple negative breast cancer – a breast cancer subtype for which there are no targeted therapies and outcomes are poor. Susan G. Komen has invested more than $66 million in over 90 research grants focused on triple negative breast cancer since it was first identified as a distinct type of breast cancer in 2006, including two research grants to Dr. Trey Westbrook and his team at Baylor College of Medicine in Houston, TX. More information on triple negative breast cancer.

 

Through a Komen-funded research grant, Dr. Westbrook and his team have identified a set of proteins, called SUMO enzymes, which are necessary for the survival of certain breast cancers. Dr. Westbrook is using this information to develop new therapeutics that target the SUMO enzymes and kill SUMO-expressing triple negative breast cancer cells.

 

Dr. Westbrook also identified a gene that is mutated in over 60 percent of triple negative breast cancer cases (and in some estrogen receptor-positive breast cancers) and is known to control several other oncogenes (cancer-promoting genes). Based on these findings, Dr. Westbrook is currently developing a combined therapy approach that will effectively target the genetic pathways associated with these mutated genes using existing therapies. He hopes to conduct a Phase I/II clinical trial of these combined therapies in the near future.

 

More information on Dr. Westbrook's research.

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My wife, Maria, was pregnant with our second child when she was diagnosed with breast cancer that had already metastasized to her ribs and spine before it was discovered. She spent months in intensive care, pregnant, taking chemo and radiation. She lived with the disease for four years, and died at 42. I've been a single dad ever since.

When your day is dedicated to taking care of your two year old son, making sure that your wife is getting the treatment that she deserves, that she requires, and you're focused on that, then having organizations that relieve you from some of that stress, the additional burdens, is immeasurable.

I received help from an organization in Dallas funded by Susan G. Komen. I've walked in four Komen 3-Day events to raise funds for Komen, so that others can receive the help that we did.

You can help support families facing breast cancer in someone they love by donating to Susan G. Komen.

Learn more about how Susan G. Komen® is helping to save lives and end breast cancer.

About 1.5 percent of women with breast cancer are pregnant when diagnosed (about 1 in 3,000 pregnancies). There are special treatment concerns for pregnant women who have breast cancer. Although cancer itself does not seem to affect the fetus, certain treatments for breast cancer can be harmful. More information on breast cancer diagnosis during pregnancy.

 

Breast cancer can have far-reaching effects beyond the person who is diagnosed. Spouses and partners, family members and other loved ones may feel many of the same emotions as the person diagnosed: shock, sadness, fear, anger and denial. While loved ones can be strong sources of support throughout diagnosis, treatment and recovery, they may also need support themselves to help get through the experience. Komen offers many resources for co-survivors and those who have lost a loved one, including educational information and message boards.

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"My grandchildren don't know about breast cancer. My grandchildren don't know how hard I've fought. But my grandchildren know that I'm here."

I AM SUSAN G. KOMEN

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"My own breast cancer journey has only ignited my research."

I AM SUSAN G. KOMEN

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"I thought my life was over at 24 years old."

I AM SUSAN G. KOMEN

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"For me, breast cancer research is not just a profession. It's personal."

I AM SUSAN G. KOMEN

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"My wife's struggle with breast cancer left our family struggling as well."

I AM SUSAN G. KOMEN

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